SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort. 

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote 1
No Image
Biography:

Dr. Adriana C. Vargas-Ojeda graduated from UNAM as a Medical Doctor, and completed her residency in pediatrics at the Hospital Infantil de México, UNAM.  Additionally, Dr. Vargas obtained her master’s degree in Educational Management at UABC and a PhD in Educational Sciences at UIA-Noroeste. She served as the Dean of the School of Medicine from 2000-2002, and as Vicerrector from 2002-2006. at the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California She is a full-time professor and has been recognized as a level 1 Investigator by the National Research System of Mexico.

Abstract:

Approximately 75% of people with type 2 diabetes in Mexico have not achieved adequate glycemic control. Systematic reviews show that educational programs for self-control of diabetes can help these patients to meet their glycemic targets. Although most of these studies have been conducted in high-income countries, 80% of the population affected with diabetes lives in low and middle income countries. Therefore, it is important to identify effective interventions for vulnerable populations.

The Dulce Wireless Tijuana Project substantially improved glycemic control and knowledge about diabetes in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes in a family medical unit in Mexico, where nurses played an important role in the management and education of patients. The nurses trained in diabetes collaborated with the responsible doctors and community health workers (promotoras) in various activities such as randomized selection of patients participating in the project, providing personalized education to patients, reviewing their clinical histories and monitoring progress towards clinical outcomes or specific behaviours, all in accordance with current clinical guidelines. Nurses also served as coordinators of community educators, in addition to recommending courses and patient support groups.Integrating peer education, coordination of nurses and wireless technology is an effective method to improve the variables of diabetes in high risk and most needy populations in low-resource settings.

Keynote 2
No Image
Biography:

Dr Sundrapragasen (Sandy) Pillay is a medical doctor, researcher, HIV clinician and occupational medicine practitioner who is director of the Enhancing Care Foundation, an NGO based in South Africa. He has led many HIV and TB research and systems strengthening programs in southern Africa. He was the Principal Investigator of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) grant for the University of KwaZulu Natal which included the Department of Nursing. This grant developed and delivered various capacity building programs to nurses in academic research and service delivery in HIV and TB care icluding upskilling of nurses in HIV/TBcare.

Abstract:

Background: South Africa (SA) is home to more than 7 million HIV-infected people and has the largest antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in the world. Given the huge burden of HIV disease, the clinical management of these patients including ART cannot be a doctor-driven, centralised service. One strategy that has been adopted by the SA Ministry of Health is to upskill nurses through a nurse-initiated management of ART (NIMART) course.

 

Methods: Enhancing Care Foundation (ECF) has developed a 16 module program to achieve information and skills transfer to nurse practitioners in HIV care. The course is based on a novel, problem-based approach and includes modules on HIV epidemiology, virology and prevention, HIV illness in adults and children, opportunistic infections, initiation and maintenace of ART in adults and children, HIV in women and HIV/TB co-infection. The course includes face to face teaching, home assignments and online support. A single quasi-experimental design using pre- and post-course questionnaires assessed knowledge change and perceptions about the course among 2 489 trainees who had benefitted from the course during the implementation period.

Keynote 2
No Image
Biography:

Ewa Wilczek Ru?yczka is associate Professor and holds the positions of Head of Department of Health Psychology at Faculty of Psychology and Humanities at Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University. She maintains research in psychology of health, empathy and burnout amoung nurses and  physicians also shie is interested in quality of life. Ewa Wilczek Ru?yczka is publishing her research in international and national jurnals also she is a member of the European Health Psychology Society.

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to determine the mediational effect of coherence on the relationship between mental load and job burnout among oncology nurses.Working stress and strain cause high mental load and can lead to job burnout among oncology nurses. Sense of coherence protects against the negative consequences of occupational mental load and may prevent professional burnout. The study was carried out with 165 oncology nurses from chemotherapy departments. The data were collected from April to September 2013 using the Antonovsky Sense of Coherence Scale, Meister questionnaire, and Maslach Burnout Inventory.

Speaker 1
No Image
Biography:

Dr David Sergio Salas-Vargas has completed his PhD at the age of 35 years at the  Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC), Mexico. He was the Dean of the School of Health Sciences for almost eight years. He is currently the Coordinator of Posgraduate and Research Studies at the School of Health Sciences at UABC and lecture Epidemiology to undergraduate and postgraduate  students. He has published in reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

Medical and Nursing students and faculty from the School of Health Sciences of the Autonomous University of Baja California campus Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico,  created a mobile clinic for the underserved population living in Ensenada, a city located in the northwest side of Mexico.

The main purpose of this mobile clinic is to improve access to health care for rural underserved communities, where students learn by serving and have the opportunity to an effective education that has implications for medical and nursing practice in the short and long term.

Once a month the mobile clinic is installed  in a rural area and students are strictly supervised by registered medical doctors and nurses.  At the end of the day there is an evaluation to measure the knowledge, the skills and change of attitudes the students have experienced through their practice in the mobile clinic.

The role of the nurses is  very important because they focus in health education promoting good dietary habits, personal hygiene, and self-care measures in general, to prevent chronic and infectious diseases among others. The results of this experience have been successfully received by the community.

The MD and the nurse establish a dumbbell to direct the treatment of the patient through personalized education and its channeling to a next level of care depending on the needs of the patient.

Speaker 2
No Image
Biography:

Samy Abdel Fatah has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Cairo University and postdoctoral studies from Cairo University School of Pharmacy. He is the director of Clinical Analysis 1992, Kasr Alaini Hospital., and Consultant for Clinical Analysis 2006.  He is Expert of the Science and Innovation Ministry and the Agency for Assessment of new technologies for research project validation 2009. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been. Now, his research focus on cell biological and biochemical biomarkers utilized for early diagnosis of diseases by detection of serum microRNA.

Abstract:

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate various biological processes. Cell-free miRNAs have been proposed as biomarkers of disease, including diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of treatment responses. These circulating miRNAs are highly stable in several body ?uids, including plasma and serum; hence, in view of their potential use as novel, non-invasive biomarkers, the pro?les of circulating miRNAs have been explored in the ?eld of anti-doping. This lecture describes the enormous potential of circulating miRNAs as a new class of biomarkers for the detection of doping substances, and highlights the advantages of measuring these stable species over other methods that have already been implemented in anti-doping regimes. Incorporating longitudinal measurements of circulating miRNAs into the Athlete Biological Passport is proposed as an ef?cient strategy for the implementation of these new biomarkers. Furthermore, potential challenges related to the transition of measurements of circulating miRNAs from research settings to practical anti-doping applications are presented. 

One of the major challenges in the anti-doping ?eld  is the identi?cation of speci?c and sensitive non-invasive biomarkers that can be routinely measured in easily accessible samples. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a particularly promising class of biomarkers; these small (22 nucleotide), non-protein-encoding RNAs post- transcriptionally regulate gene expression via suppression of speci?c target mRNA. Furthermore, miRNAs have been shown to have a diagnostic or prognostic role and even potential clinical implications for targeted gene therapy in cancer patients.

 

Speaker 3
No Image
Biography:

I work as a lecturer in the Faculty of Nursing Midwifery and Palliative Care at Kings College London. I teach across a variety of undergraduate and post graduate modules. My Masters and PhD respectively are: “The Lived Experience of Children Living as AIDS Orphan’s in Township Communities in South Africa”; and “The Development of Strategies to Provide Care and Support to Children Living as AIDS Orphans in Township Communities in South Africa”. I am have recently undertaken a cluster analysis to further understand the “Barriers to” and Recommendations for” Providing Care and Support to Children living as AIDS Orphan’s in Township Communities in South Africa. I am currently refining an intervention for implementation based upon these findings.

Abstract:

Background: Orphanhood is a major consequence of the AIDS pandemic globally. In South Africa most childrenwho are AIDS orphans live in township communities. They are often uncared for and unsupported by thecommunity, and experience recurrent psychological trauma and much personal suffering. This results in healthand social care professionals working with these children experiencing professional anguish. Whilst it is knownthat children who live as AIDS orphans in township communities suffer, there are no empirical studies reflectingthe experiences of health and social care professionals providing care and support to these vulnerable children.Objective: To explore and describe the experiences of primary health care nurses, social workers and psychologistscaring for and supporting children who are AIDS orphans living in township communities in South Africa.Design: The descriptive phenomenology research design incorporated an exploratory, contextual and descriptiveapproach. In-depth individual interviews were used to collect data from participants.Setting: Participants were selected using purposive (nurses and social workers) and snowball sampling (psychologists)from four primary health care clinics and twelve satellite health care clinics, all located in townshipcommunities in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa. The participants were all caring for and supporting childrenwho are AIDS orphans living in these communities.

Speaker 4
Biography:

Dr. Rania Elsallamy : Is an Egyptian Lecturer occupational medicine.Faculty of Medicine Tanta University ,Egypt. Date of birth 5/7/1972.live inHeliopolis Cairo Egypt . MD Degree in:  Industrial Medicine and Occupational Health. Egypt in April 2010. Master Degree: Industrial Medicine and Occupational Health. Egypt in April 2003. MB BCh Degree:  from the Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Egypt in    November 1995. Certified Trainer from UNICEF  Organization and National Population Council. Member of Egyptian Society of Fitness, Disability & Environmental Health. Member of the Egyptian medical association for the study of obesity (EMASO). Consultant Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract:

Hospital workers are exposed to many occupational hazards that may threaten their health and safety. Physical hazards encountered in hospital working environment include temperature, illumination, noise, electrical injuries and radiation. Objectives: To assess the awareness of healthcare workers about physical hazards in Tanta university hospitals. Subjects & methods: This cross-sectional study included 401 HCWs (physicians, nurses, technicians, and workers) from seven departments (general surgery, orthopedics, radiology, ophthalmology, kitchen, incinerator, and laundry). Data were collected through interview questionnaire to assess six types of physical hazards (noise, electric hazards, temperature, radiation, fire, and lighting,).Results: Most of the physicians (63.7%) were aware of the level of noise. All physicians, nurses, technicians, and majority of workers reported that hearing protective devices were not available, and all HCWs reported that periodic hearing examination was not performed.. Most HCWs were not given appropriate radiation safety training before starting work (88% of workers, 73.7% of nurses, 65.7% of physicians, and 68.3% of technicians). The majority of physicians, nurses, and technicians (70.5, 65.4, and 53.7%) denied regular environmental monitoring for radiation level inside work place. Recommendations: Health education programs on physical hazards should be mandatory to all healthcare workers to improve their awareness and protect them from undue exposures.