SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort.

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote 1
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Biography:

Prof JMMathibe-Neke is an Associate Professor at the University of South Africa (UNISA). She received a PhD with the university of the Witwatersrand and a Master on Medicine Degree in Bioethics and Health Law from the university of the Witwatersrand. Further holds a Master’s Degree in Midwifery from the University of Johannesburg. Obtained a Bachelor’s Degree and an Honours Degree from UNISA.  A Diploma in General Nursing and a Diploma in Midwifery. She is currently a lecturer in Ethics and supervising 11 Doctoral students and 1 Master student in Women’s Health and Midwifery with 11 Masters and 6 Doctoral graduated students.        

Abstract:

The general purpose of the pilot project was to raise the midwives’ awareness of psychosocial care during pregnancy, to fill the gap that exist in routine antenatal care and to improve the use of psychosocial services. A psychosocial risk assessment tool was administered in randomly selected Community Health Centres that provides antenatal care in Gauteng Province, South Africa.  

Keynote 2
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Biography:

She is an associate professor belonging to the Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University. She is a physical therapist. She got a master's degree in Physical Education from the University of Tsukuba and a Ph.D. in Sports Science at Waseda University. Her specialty is rehabilitation of  spinal cord injuries and sports for disabled, and prosthetic devices. Her activities are paralympic suport and doping control.         

Abstract:

Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) have decreased vasomotor control and perspiration ability corresponding to the level of spinal damage. This study compared body surface temperatures between wheelchair rugby players with cervical SCI (CSCI) and wheelchair basketball players with thoracolumbar SCI (TSCI). Methods: This is an observational study, including 20 male athletes with SCI. The participants practiced wheelchair rugby and wheelchair basketball as per the format of a traditional game in a hot indoor environment. Body surface temperatures were measured before and after practice by thermography. Heart rate (HR) and maximum temperatures at measured sites (forehead, upper extremities, and lower extremities) were assessed. Results: Body surface temperatures showed a significant correlation between pre- and post-exercise and between groups (CSCI and TSCI), indicating that temperature changes were different between the groups. The temperature before exercise was higher in the TSCI group than in the CSCI group. The temperature after exercise was higher in the CSCI group than in the TSCI group; however, no significant difference was found . Conclusions: We observed that the increase in body surface temperature because of exercise was higher in the CSCI group than in the TSCI group. There was no difference between the groups in terms of temperature on the forehead, where perspiration can occur. Cooling during the game was unable to prevent temperature increase.

Keynote 3
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Biography:

Margaret I. Fitch completed her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto. She holds the positions of Head of Oncology Nursing and Supportive Care and Director of the Patient and Family Support Program at the Odette Cancer Centre and is associate Professor (Faculty of Nursing) and Professor (School of Graduate Studies) at the University of Toronto. She maintains an active research program in supportive care and publishes regularly. She is expert lead for the patient reported outcomes/survivorship at the Canadian partnership against cancer. She is also a past president of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care.

Abstract:

Accreditation bodies in the USA, the UK, and Europe have mandated that jurisdictions regularly screen patients for distress. Recent reports suggest that facilities struggle to overcome implementation barriers. In Canada, a Screening for Distress (6th vital sign) Initiative was implemented in eight cancer treatment facilities in seven provinces. With national support and coordination from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, the Initiative’s ultimate goal was to provide timely and appropriate response to cancer patients’ distress to improve the patient experience. The implementation included the application of evidence-informed tools by trained health care professionals to identify distress, facilitate intervention or referral, and enhance collaboration among health care providers to meet patient needs. Implementations have expanded in these facilities since the launch of the initiative and the success of this programmatic approach in Canada may assist other jurisdictions with successful implementation of Screening for Distress (6th vital sign).

Speaker 1
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Biography:

Mr.Kenji Kotaki received a doctor of philosophy in medical science and dental science from Nagasaki University, Japan. His current field placement is with the Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Fukuoka Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Omuta, Japan. His research interests include The relationship between air pollution and COPD and studying epidemiology of COPD, prevention of Sarcopenia and Frailty

Abstract:

COPD is a respiratory condition that develops from long-term exposure to air pollutants and through smoking. The Japanese Respiratory Society’s guidelines for the management of COPD list exogenous risk factors such as tobacco smoke, atmospheric pollution, passive smoking, aging?The current air pollution problem in Japan and its aging society are expected to result in increased COPD morbidity.

 

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exposure to air pollution and cigarette smoke on respiratory function, respiratory symptoms, and the prevalence of COPD in individuals aged ≥50 years. 

 

Patients and methods: We used spirometry and medical questionnaires to screen 433 individuals from Omuta City, Japan, an area with high levels of air pollution. 

Speaker 2
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Biography:

Dr. Conley works full-time at Research Medical Center, a Level 1 trauma center, as a Charge Nurse on the Progressive Care Unit.  She received her bachelor’s and master’s degree from Saint Louis University and doctorate degree from Medical University of South Carolina. In addition, she is a member of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, Sigma Theta Tau International, and Kansas City Nurse Research Consortium. Her research interests are in COPD and critical care nursing. In addition, she was awarded March of Dimes Nurse of the Year (Intermediate Care/Telemetry, 2017) and HCA Excellence in Nursing award (2018).

Abstract:

Discharge instructions were given to participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to promote improved health outcomes, reduce incidence of hospitalization, and enhance quality of life (QOL). This study evaluated the feasibility of the American Lung Association’s COPD Action Plan and assessment of QOL among participants hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD or COPD as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Methods: The study was conducted on a cohort of critically ill participants hospitalized on a progressive care unit. The Principal Investigator administered the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Questionnaire to assess QOL before discharge and 30 days after discharge via phone call. Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance was used to evaluate outcomes from the discharge study.  Results: Among participants enrolled (n = 50), 13 completed the in-hospital and follow-up phone call. Participants scored (12; 92% answered “yes”) that they learned appropriate COPD self-management skills, involving a change in respiratory symptoms and appropriate actions to take. Thirty-day follow-up revealed: number of rehospitalizations (12; 99%), no emergency department visits, and (1; 1%) emergency department visit for insulin reaction, not COPD. Most frequent principal admitted diagnosis was acute respiratory failure, and secondary diagnosis was COPD.  Using the Wilcoxon sign-rank test, there was no significant difference in QOL, comparing scores at discharge to initial scoring during hospitalization.  Implications for Practice: COPD education can improve participant satisfaction in receiving self-management instructions from an action plan near the time of discharge based on a small sample.

Speaker 3
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Biography:

Dr. Karla A. Caillouet holds a Master’s of Science degree in Community Health Education, specializing in Health Promotion and Worksite Wellness, and a Doctorate of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, specializing in Health and Physical Education. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist and a Certified Intrinsic Coach. Dr. Caillouet is currently an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia Gwinnett College in the School of Science and Technology. Along with her teaching duties and research, Dr. Caillouet serves as the Health Promotion Curriculum Committee Chair and the Health Promotion Internship Coordinator. She also serves on multiple committees, including the Grizzlies Helping Grizzlies Task Force, the college-wide Internship Committee, and others. Dr. Caillouet’s research practices have focused on planning, implementing, and evaluating evidence-based interventions to improve health within a variety of settings including college campuses, worksite wellness programs, assisted-living facilities, and disability centers. She has also performed a variety of research projects using secondary data in epidemiological studies.

Abstract:

Health empowerment is an individual’s perceived control and competence related to health and health care. The projected increased growth of the older adult population calls for a health-related empowerment movement in health education that targets older adults. Using the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association of health empowerment and handgrip strength with intention to participate in physical activity among older adults. Methods: The Korean Health Empowerment Scale (K-HES) was used as a measure of health empowerment. Handgrip strength was used as a measure of muscle strength. Intention to participate in physical activity was measured using five items. Participants of this study included 103 community-dwelling older adults (Mage=76.45+9.395; Male=42, Female=61). Results: Statistical analyses revealed all participants were knowledgeable about the health benefits of exercise and most participated in regular physical activity (n=84.5%). The majority had normal handgrip strength (n=60.7%) and most indicated strong intentions to participate in regular physical activity (n=85%). A stepwise multiple regression revealed health empowerment significantly and positively (F(1,101) = 30.511, p < .001, R2 = .232, R2Adjusted = .224) associated intention to participate in physical activity. Health empowerment explained 23.2% of the variance in intentions. There was no significant contribution of muscle strength on intention. Discussion: Findings suggest overall health empowerment may be affected by a variety of subscales such as problem-solving, obtaining support, motivation, psychosocial coping, and decision making. Conclusion: Future research should explore potential associations between health empowerment and intention to participate in physical activity

Speaker 4

Ms. Bhavna Khemlani

Bangkok School of Management ,Thailand

Title: Mindfulness - Growth Mindset

Time : 14:15 - 16:15

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Abstract:

Mindfulness is essential for everyone and identifying the inner sense, co-creating, learning, living the balance, embracing Gratitude whilst becoming more aware about Emotional Intelligence is necessary for every health practitioner.

 

The workshop is separated into three segments:

 

Part 1: Growth Mindset

 

Prism of Possibilities: The phrase refers to execution of various possibilities in Life (Journey), such as, innovative ideas/skills; leadership; re-programming the mind; goals; learning of self; thriving; co-creation, abundance, being mindful and becoming the ‘Gratifying & Dynamic’ version where ‘Prism’ represents ‘Self’.

 

Part 2: Gratitude & Reflection

 

Gratitude is strongly and consistently associated with greater happiness. Gratitude helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships, Harvard Health Education 2018.

 

Part 3: Mindfulness Breathing & Meditation

 

Breathing, following the breath, helps focus the mind and bring you back to the present moment. Through meditation and breathing you will be better able to deal with various situations without losing your equanimity and increasing productivity.

Poster 1

Yorimitsu Furukawa

Tokyo Metropolitan University ,Japan

Title: Low Back Pain Measures for Long-Term Care Health Facility Staff.

Time : 16:45 - 17:15

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Biography:

Mr. Yorimitsu Furukawa is Associate Professor of the Department of Physical Therapy of the Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a PhD from Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan. His research interests include physical therapy, kinesiology, disability science, physical fitness and health science.

 

Abstract:

The aim of this study, to grasp the reality of low back pain of nursing staff working in Long-Term Care Health Facility, performs a movement guidance and lectures on low back pain, it was decided to explore the factors necessary for low back pain measures of nursing staff. To target the Long-Term Care Health Facility staff was carried out twice a survey on low back pain in a self-programming method. It was carried out in the subject and guidance lecture after the first survey. The contents of the lectures and teaching was anatomy and kinematic knowledge and back pain prevention exercises related to low back pain. Survey content, was the presence or absence of low back pain, daily living activities, assistance operation and the improvement measures to be the cause of low back pain, knowledge of low back pain, low back pain measures are carried out in the self, and the status of implementation of strength training. It compared the results of the investigation in the first and second times. Furthermore, it was compared between those improved back pain was observed (improvement group) and those improvements was observed (non-improvement group). Even without exercise instruction individually, low back pain prevalence is improving trend was observed. In particular improvement group, after the lecture and exercise instruction, muscle strengthening exercise tailored to their own, it was often incorporating select the stretch. From these, the improved group was suggested that there was a conversion of awareness back pain.

Poster 2

Mari Sugiyama

Tokyo Metropolitan University ,Japan

Title: Positioning Factors Associated With Lateral Fibula Diaphyseal Pressure Injuries

Time : 16:45 - 17:15

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Biography:

Mari Sugiyama is a first-year graduate student in the department of physical therapy of Tokyo Metropolitan University. She has been a Physical Therapist for over 20 years and has worked in the rehabilitation field specializing in seating and wheeled mobility. She has extensive experience in planning and evaluating treatment and administering care to individual patients,especially ones with spinal cord injuries. Her research interests include wheelchair seating, pressure injuries, and metabolic syndrome of the disabled people.

 

Abstract:

Bony prominences often lead to pressure injuries. In this study, we describe cases of pressure injuries of the lateral fibula diaphysis not associated with bony prominences, and discuss prevention and treatment options. Subjects were 6 inpatients who had positioning pillows placed to reduce pressure on the heel were included in this study. The medical records of each patient were perused to identify pressure injuries and motor dysfunction as well as the position of the hip joint. Pressure injuries occurred over the lateral fibula diaphysis in 3 out of 6 cases. They were elongated and oval in shape, and occurred bilaterally over the diaphysis and not over the head of the fibula or the lateral malleolus. All subjects had paralysis in the lower extremities as well as motor and sensory dysfunction. In the subjects who had external rotation of the hip, pressure injuries developed over the lateral fibula diaphysis. Three types of positioning pillows were used that are common in Japan: dedicated positioning pillows, rolled towels, and blankets. Dedicated positioning pillows were not used in any of the cases that pressure injuries occurred. The position of the hip is an important variable in the development of pressure injuries. The lateral fibula has less soft tissue compared with the buttock and thigh, particularly in cases of muscle atrophy caused by motor disturbances or emaciation, which can lead to the fibular diaphysis becoming a bony prominence. Further use of the many available types of exclusive positioning pillows is recommended.

Poster 3

Kyoko Kajihara

Nursing college ,Japan

Title: Midwifery Education of Historical Perspective in Japan

Time : 16:45 - 17:15

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Biography:

Kyoko Kajihara have a licenses of nurse and midwife in Japan. Also Kyoko Kajihara had worked at the maternity and NICU ward in the hospital for 15 years. And then,Kyoko have been teaching nursing care in maternal and women’s health in the nursing college for 16 years. Kyoko interested in the history of midwifery education. So, Kyoko is the member of the Japanese Society for the History of Medicine,and Nursing. Kyoko Kajihara also keep studying and researching about the women’s health and midwifery education in the world.

Abstract:

 

The name of "midwife" had been changing from the ancient time to now. It was changed by "woman who assist the childbirth" in 1948 and “midwife" in 2002 .In the Meiji era (from 1867~), there is an old midwife and a new midwife. The old midwife who didn't get professional education at that time. They were supported by experience by their own and traditional knowledge. On the other hand "new midwife" is a qualifier, the persons who became a midwife later and they got the education by Western medicine.

 

A medical system was promulgated in 1874, and midwifery education and qualification were required. Education starts with new system from Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka, and it has begun to spread over an area gradually. An educational course was performed and for the old midwives supported by only traditional technology more to become a new midwife. Delivery science was revised by a midwife regulation in 1947 from medicine system promulgation in 1874 and a midwife regulation in 1899 and subsumed under a preservation of law by public health nurse, midwife and nurse.

Poster 4
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Biography:

Jun Okamoto is a sophomore in the Department of Physical Therapy at Tokyo MetropolitanUniversity. He has been a physical therapist for 13 years and works in the field ofrehabilitation specializing in central nervous system diseases, orthopedic diseases andrespiratory diseases. He will evaluate individual patients, especially COPD and plantreatments. His field of research is pulmonary rehabilitation and music therapy.

Abstract:

ADL is restricted in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to depression and anxiety associated with dyspnea. Depression and anxiety in patients with COPD are related to decreasing QOL and mortality rate. Decline in exercise tolerability is a high risk of hospitalization and re-hospitalization and increases mortality rate. It has been reported that pulmonary function parameters and physiological, psychological, and physical factors were improved by pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and music therapy (MT) . The aim ofthis study was to clarify how pulmonary function parameters, physiological, psychological and physical factors will be improved by PR and MT . Patients who are hospitalized and diagnosed with COPD will be devided into two groups : PR intervention group and MT combination group. PR program includes conditioning, respiratory muscle training, strength training, endurance training. MT program includes vocal exercises, singing and breathing exercises using a keyboard harmonica. PR intervention group will perform 40 minutes of PR and 20 minutes of leisure acitivity in sitting position every day for 4 weeks, and MT combination group will perform 40 minutes of PR and 20 minutes of MT every day for 4 weeks. As results, using MT in combination will reduce dyspnea, depression and anxiety, and will improve QOL score, exercise tolerance and ADL. I assume that MT program consists of vocal exercises, singing and breathing exercises will improve qualitative treatment effect of PR and lead to a new strategic treatment in COPD patients.

Poster 5

I. Milaniak

Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University ,Poland

Title: Hospital Readmission rates in Patients with Left Ventricular assist Device

Time : 16:45 - 17:15

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Biography:

My name is Irena Milaniak. I'm registered nurse and master sciense in nursing. I have been practicing as a transplant coordinator at John Paul II Hospital, Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology Dpt. Krakow, Poland from 1997 and as regional transplant coordinator at national sharing agency Polish Transplant Coordinating Center POLTRANSPLANT from 2007. My practical experience level is very high. I have managed of waiting list and recipients after transplantation for more than 20 years. As a regional transplant coordinator I deal with organ donor procurement and donor detection. From many years I have involved in social educational campaign raising organ donation awareness addresses to students, society and medical professionals. From 2014 I’m physician doctor. I’ve published I presented many scientific papers concerning organ donation education as well psychological recipients’ problems. 

Abstract:

Introduction : The number of patients provided with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is steadily increasing. Hospital readmission rates after LVAD therapy is still very high. Identification reason for readmission is very important to potential areas for quality improvement and cost containment.

 

Objectives : Analyzes  the unplanned readmission of patients with LVAD.

 

Methods: Retrospective analasys  the clinical course for 50 patients who underwent continuous flow LVAD implantation (HEARTMATE III/HEARTWARE) between Oct 2015 to Dec 2018  was performed.

 

We evaluated: time after LVAD implantation, the cause of readmission, length of hospital stayed  from electronic medical record

Poster 6
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Biography:

My name is Irena Milaniak. I'm registered nurse and master sciense in nursing. I have been practicing as a transplant coordinator at John Paul II Hospital, Cardiovascular Surgery and Transplantology Dpt. Krakow, Poland from 1997 and as regional transplant coordinator at national sharing agency Polish Transplant Coordinating Center POLTRANSPLANT from 2007. My practical experience level is very high. I have managed of waiting list and recipients after transplantation for more than 20 years. As a regional transplant coordinator I deal with organ donor procurement and donor detection. From many years I have involved in social educational campaign raising organ donation awareness addresses to students, society and medical professionals. From 2014 I’m physician doctor. I’ve published I presented many scientific papers concerning organ donation education as well psychological recipients’ problems. 

Abstract:

The aim of the study: The measurement adherence and attitude towards health locus of control and self-efficacy among heart and kidney recipients.

 

Methods: Adult kidney as well heart transplant patients from two centers were included to the study. Patient completed 6-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-6), Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale (MHLC) and General Self Efficacy Scale (GSES), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) in addiction to several socio-demographic and transplant related data.

 

Result: The preliminary study group consisted of 73 recipients (47 heart transplant recipients and 25 kidney recipients). The mean self-assessment of adherence was 8,6 pt. They reported moderate adherence and half of recipients reported good adherence to the immunosuppressive treatment. There was not difference between variables and kind of transplantation as well as center. The self-assessment was related to depressive symptoms  (r=-0,23, P<0,05) as well as (MMAS-6). The study group presented good attitude towards  health locus of control and self-efficacy.

Speaker 5
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Biography:

Michal Granot, RN, PhD is an Associate professor at the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. She graduated as BA in Nursing in 1987, and received her PhD degree in 1998 at the Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel. Her clinical background is midwifery. During the past 20 years, her research focus is on psychophysical, cognitive and personality perspectives of pain as well as patient-provider relationships and women's health. She has been volunteering for many years in a hospice, supporting people who are dying of cancer and cope with pain.       


 

Abstract:

Nnursing studies points to the need to consider patient’s preference for treatment, to attain better clinical outcomes which attributes to activation of cognitive processes that involved in analgesic effect. This study aimed to explore whether medication administered via a route that matches with patient's preference (intramuscular-injection or oral) increases pain relife. Severe acute-low-back-pain patients (n=38) reported their preference for analgesics administration-route. Pain ratings, pain sensitivity scores (obtained by the pain sensitivity questionnaire (PSQ), level of optimism and self-efficacy were assessed to explore their associations with preference. To determine whether preference of oral (PO) or intramuscular-injection (IM) affect the analgesic response, patients were randomly assigned to receive either PO or IM diclofenac (NSAIDs 100mg), regardless of their initial analgesic administration-route preference. Pain intensity was measured before and during the first hour after drug administration. Although no differences were found in the level of pain attenuation, patients who received the drug according to their desired route (4.05±2.8) (whether oral treatment or injection) reported a significantly greater reduction in pain levels compared with patients who received it in the undesired route (2.08±1.8) P<0.05. Higher pain sensitivity but not, level of optimism of self-efficacy was associated with enhances base-line pain scores (r=.424, p=0.013). Patient’s preference expresses a cognitive process, influenced by beliefs, expectations, and conditioning, which are recognized as key components of the analgesic placebo response. It can be assumed that in addition to the direct pharmacological effect of analgesics, endogenous analgesic processes were triggered by concordance between actual treatment and patient's preferred-administration-route interact.